Article 6.

Communicable Diseases.

Part 1. In General.

§ 130A-133: Repealed by Session Laws 2002-179, s. 3, effective October 1, 2002.

 

§ 130A-134.  Reportable diseases and conditions.

The Commission shall establish by rule a list of communicable diseases and communicable conditions to be reported. (1983, c. 891, s. 2; 1987, c. 782, s. 4.)

 

§ 130A-135.  Physicians to report.

A physician licensed to practice medicine who has reason to suspect that a person about whom the physician has been consulted professionally has a communicable disease or communicable condition declared by the Commission to be reported, shall report information required by the Commission to the local health director of the county or district in which the physician is consulted.  The Commission shall declare confirmed HIV infection to be a reportable communicable condition. (1893, c. 214, s. 11; Rev., s. 3448; 1917, c. 263, s. 7; C.S., s. 7151; 1921, c. 223, s. 1; 1957, c. 1357, s. 1; 1973, c. 476, s. 128; 1983, c. 891, s. 2; 1987, c. 782, s. 5; 1989, c. 698, s. 3.)

 

§ 130A-136.  School principals and child care operators to report.

A principal of a school and an operator of a child care facility, as defined in G.S. 110-86(3), who has reason to suspect that a person within the school or child care facility has a communicable disease or communicable condition declared by the Commission to be reported, shall report information required by the Commission to the local health director of the county or district in which the school or facility is located. (1979, c. 192, s. 2; 1983, c. 891, s. 2; 1987, c. 782, s. 6; 1997-506, s. 46.)

 

§ 130A-137.  Medical facilities may report.

A medical facility, in which there is a patient reasonably suspected of having a communicable disease or condition declared by the Commission to be reported, may report information specified by the Commission to the local health director of the county or district in which the facility is located. (1983, c. 891, s. 2; 1987, c. 782, s. 7.)

 

§ 130A-138.  Operators of restaurants and other food or drink establishments to report.

An operator of a restaurant or other establishment where food or drink is prepared or served for pay, as defined in G.S. 130A-247(4) and (5), shall report information required by the Commission to the local health director of the county or district in which the restaurant or food establishment is located when the operator has reason to suspect an outbreak of food-borne illness in its customers or employees or when it has reason to suspect that a food handler at the establishment has a food-borne disease or food-borne condition required by the Commission to be reported. (1917, c. 263, s. 9; C.S., s. 7153; 1921, c. 223, s. 3; 1957, c. 1357, s. 1; 1973, c. 476, s. 128; 1979, c. 192, s. 3; 1983, c. 891, s. 2; 1987, c. 782, s. 8.)

 

§ 130A-139.  Persons in charge of laboratories to report.

A person in charge of a laboratory providing diagnostic service in this State shall report information required by the Commission to a public health agency specified by the Commission when the laboratory makes any of the following findings:

(1)        Sputa, gastric contents, or other specimens which are smear positive for acid fast bacilli or culture positive for Mycobacterium tuberculosis;

(2)        Urethral smears positive for Gram-negative intracellular diplococci or any culture positive for Neisseria gonorrhoeae;

(3)        Positive serological tests for syphilis or positive darkfield examination;

(4)        Any other positive test indicative of a communicable disease or communicable condition for which laboratory reporting is required by the Commission. (1981, c. 81, s. 1; 1983, c. 891, s. 2; 1987, c. 782, s. 9; 2001-28, s. 1.)

 

§ 130A-140.  Local health directors to report.

A local health director shall report to the Department all cases of diseases or conditions or laboratory findings of residents of the jurisdiction of the local health department which are reported to the local health director pursuant to this Article. A local health director shall report all other cases and laboratory findings reported pursuant to this Article to the local health director of the county, district, or authority where the person with the reportable disease or condition or laboratory finding resides. (1919, c. 206, s. 2; C.S., s. 7192; 1957, c. 1357, s. 1; 1961, c. 753; 1973, c. 476, s. 128; 1983, c. 891, s. 2; 1987, c. 782, s. 10; 1997-502, s. 10.)

 

§ 130A-141.  Form, content and timing of reports.

The Commission shall adopt rules which establish the specific information to be submitted when making a report required by this Article, time limits for reporting, the form of the reports and to whom reports of laboratory findings are to be made. (1983, c. 891, s. 2; 1987, c. 782, s. 11.)

 

§ 130A-141.1.  Temporary order to report.

(a)        The State Health Director may issue a temporary order requiring health care providers to report symptoms, diseases, conditions, trends in use of health care services, or other health-related information when necessary to conduct a public health investigation or surveillance of an illness, condition, or symptoms that may indicate the existence of a communicable disease or condition that presents a danger to the public health. The order shall specify which health care providers must report, what information is to be reported, and the period of time for which reporting is required. The period of time for which reporting is required pursuant to a temporary order shall not exceed 90 days. The Commission may adopt rules to continue the reporting requirement when necessary to protect the public health.

(b)        For the purposes of this section, the term "health care provider" has the same meaning as that term is defined in G.S. 130A-476(g). (2004-80, s. 5.)

 

§ 130A-142.  Immunity of persons who report.

A person who makes a report pursuant to the provisions of this Article shall be immune from any civil or criminal liability that might otherwise be incurred or imposed as a result of making that report. (1983, c. 891, s. 2; 1987, c. 782, s. 12.)

 

§ 130A-143.  Confidentiality of records.

All information and records, whether publicly or privately maintained, that identify a person who has AIDS virus infection or who has or may have a disease or condition required to be reported pursuant to the provisions of this Article shall be strictly confidential. This information shall not be released or made public except under the following circumstances:

(1)        Release is made of specific medical or epidemiological information for statistical purposes in a way that no person can be identified;

(2)        Release is made of all or part of the medical record with the written consent of the person or persons identified or their guardian;

(3)        Release is made for purposes of treatment, payment, research, or health care operations to the extent that disclosure is permitted under 45 Code of Federal Regulations §§ 164.506 and 164.512(i). For purposes of this section, the terms "treatment," "payment," "research," and "health care operations" have the meaning given those terms in 45 Code of Federal Regulations § 164.501;

(4)        Release is necessary to protect the public health and is made as provided by the Commission in its rules regarding control measures for communicable diseases and conditions;

(5)        Release is made pursuant to other provisions of this Article;

(6)        Release is made pursuant to subpoena or court order. Upon request of the person identified in the record, the record shall be reviewed in camera. In the trial, the trial judge may, during the taking of testimony concerning such information, exclude from the courtroom all persons except the officers of the court, the parties and those engaged in the trial of the case;

(7)        Release is made by the Department or a local health department to a court or a law enforcement official for the purpose of enforcing this Article or Article 22 of this Chapter, or investigating a terrorist incident using nuclear, biological, or chemical agents. A law enforcement official who receives the information shall not disclose it further, except (i) when necessary to enforce this Article or Article 22 of this Chapter, or when necessary to conduct an investigation of a terrorist incident using nuclear, biological, or chemical agents, or (ii) when the Department or a local health department seeks the assistance of the law enforcement official in preventing or controlling the spread of the disease or condition and expressly authorizes the disclosure as necessary for that purpose;

(8)        Release is made by the Department or a local health department to another federal, state or local public health agency for the purpose of preventing or controlling the spread of a communicable disease or communicable condition;

(9)        Release is made by the Department for bona fide research purposes. The Commission shall adopt rules providing for the use of the information for research purposes;

(10)      Release is made pursuant to G.S. 130A-144(b); or

(11)      Release is made pursuant to any other provisions of law that specifically authorize or require the release of information or records related to AIDS.  (1983, c. 891, s. 2; 1987, c. 782, s. 13; 2002-179, s. 7; 2011-314, s. 4.)

 

§ 130A-144.  Investigation and control measures.

(a)        The local health director shall investigate, as required by the Commission, cases of communicable diseases and communicable conditions reported to the local health director pursuant to this Article.

(b)        Physicians, persons in charge of medical facilities or laboratories, and other persons shall, upon request and proper identification, permit a local health director or the State Health Director to examine, review, and obtain a copy of medical or other records in their possession or under their control which the State Health Director or a local health director determines pertain to the (i) diagnosis, treatment, or prevention of a communicable disease or communicable condition for a person infected, exposed, or reasonably suspected of being infected or exposed to such a disease or condition, or (ii) the investigation of a known or reasonably suspected outbreak of a communicable disease or communicable condition.

(c)        A physician or a person in charge of a medical facility or laboratory who permits examination, review or copying of medical records pursuant to subsection (b) shall be immune from any civil or criminal liability that otherwise might be incurred or imposed as a result of complying with a request made pursuant to subsection (b).

(d)       The attending physician shall give control measures prescribed by the Commission to a patient with a communicable disease or communicable condition and to patients reasonably suspected of being infected or exposed to such a disease or condition. The physician shall also give control measures to other individuals as required by rules adopted by the Commission.

(e)        The local health director shall ensure that control measures prescribed by the Commission have been given to prevent the spread of all reportable communicable diseases or communicable conditions and any other communicable disease or communicable condition that represents a significant threat to the public health. The local health department shall provide, at no cost to the patient, the examination and treatment for tuberculosis disease and infection and for sexually transmitted diseases designated by the Commission.

(f)        All persons shall comply with control measures, including submission to examinations and tests, prescribed by the Commission subject to the limitations of G.S. 130A-148.

(g)        The Commission shall adopt rules that prescribe control measures for communicable diseases and conditions subject to the limitations of G.S. 130A-148. Temporary rules prescribing control measures for communicable diseases and conditions shall be adopted pursuant to G.S. 150B-13.

(h)        Anyone who assists in an inquiry or investigation conducted by the State Health Director for the purpose of evaluating the risk of transmission of HIV or Hepatitis B from an infected health care worker to patients, or who serves on an expert panel established by the State Health Director for that purpose, shall be immune from civil liability that otherwise might be incurred or imposed for any acts or omissions which result from such assistance or service, provided that the person acts in good faith and the acts or omissions do not amount to gross negligence, willful or wanton misconduct, or intentional wrongdoing. This qualified immunity does not apply to acts or omissions which occur with respect to the operation of a motor vehicle. Nothing in this subsection provides immunity from liability for a violation of G.S. 130A-143.  (1893, c. 214, s. 16; Rev., s. 4459; 1909, c. 793, s. 8; C.S., s. 7158; 1957, c. 1357, s. 1; 1973, c. 476, s. 128; 1983, c. 891, s. 2; 1987, c. 782, s. 14; 1991, c. 225, s. 1; 1995, c. 228, s. 1; 2001-28, s. 2; 2004-80, s. 6; 2009-501, s. 2.)

 

§ 130A-145.  Quarantine and isolation authority.

(a)        The State Health Director and a local health director are empowered to exercise quarantine and isolation authority. Quarantine and isolation authority shall be exercised only when and so long as the public health is endangered, all other reasonable means for correcting the problem have been exhausted, and no less restrictive alternative exists.

(b)        No person other than a person authorized by the State Health Director or local health director shall enter quarantine or isolation premises. Nothing in this subsection shall be construed to restrict the access of authorized health care, law enforcement, or emergency medical services personnel to quarantine or isolation premises as necessary in conducting their duties.

(c)        Before applying quarantine or isolation authority to livestock or poultry for the purpose of preventing the direct or indirect conveyance of an infectious agent to persons, the State Health Director or a local health director shall consult with the State Veterinarian in the Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services.

(d)       When quarantine or isolation limits the freedom of movement of a person or animal or of access to a person or animal whose freedom of movement is limited, the period of limited freedom of movement or access shall not exceed 30 calendar days. Any person substantially affected by that limitation may institute in superior court in Wake County or in the county in which the limitation is imposed an action to review that limitation. The official who exercises the quarantine or isolation authority shall give the persons known by the official to be substantially affected by the limitation reasonable notice under the circumstances of the right to institute an action to review the limitation. If a person or a person's representative requests a hearing, the hearing shall be held within 72 hours of the filing of that request, excluding Saturdays and Sundays. The person substantially affected by that limitation is entitled to be represented by counsel of the person's own choice or if the person is indigent, the person shall be represented by counsel appointed in accordance with Article 36 of Chapter 7A of the General Statutes and the rules adopted by the Office of Indigent Defense Services. The court shall reduce or terminate the limitation unless it determines, by the preponderance of the evidence, that the limitation is reasonably necessary to prevent or limit the conveyance of a communicable disease or condition to others.

If the State Health Director or the local health director determines that a 30-calendar-day limitation on freedom of movement or access is not adequate to protect the public health, the State Health Director or local health director must institute in superior court in the county in which the limitation is imposed an action to obtain an order extending the period of limitation of freedom of movement or access. If the person substantially affected by the limitation has already instituted an action in superior court in Wake County, the State Health Director must institute the action in superior court in Wake County or as a counterclaim in the pending case. Except as provided below for persons with tuberculosis, the court shall continue the limitation for a period not to exceed 30 days if it determines, by the preponderance of the evidence, that the limitation is reasonably necessary to prevent or limit the conveyance of a communicable disease or condition to others. The court order shall specify the period of time the limitation is to be continued and shall provide for automatic termination of the order upon written determination by the State Health Director or local health director that the quarantine or isolation is no longer necessary to protect the public health. In addition, where the petitioner can prove by a preponderance of the evidence that quarantine or isolation was not or is no longer needed for protection of the public health, the person quarantined or isolated may move the trial court to reconsider its order extending quarantine or isolation before the time for the order otherwise expires and may seek immediate or expedited termination of the order. Before the expiration of an order issued under this section, the State Health Director or local health director may move to continue the order for additional periods not to exceed 30 days each. If the person whose freedom of movement has been limited has tuberculosis, the court shall continue the limitation for a period not to exceed one calendar year if it determines, by a preponderance of the evidence, that the limitation is reasonably necessary to prevent or limit the conveyance of tuberculosis to others. The court order shall specify the period of time the limitation is to be continued and shall provide for automatic termination of the order upon written determination by the State Health Director or local health director that the quarantine or isolation is no longer necessary to protect the public health. In addition, where the petitioner can prove by a preponderance of the evidence that quarantine or isolation was not or is no longer needed for protection of the public health, the person quarantined or isolated may move the trial court to reconsider its order extending quarantine or isolation before the time for the order otherwise expires and may seek immediate or expedited termination of the order. Before the expiration of an order limiting the freedom of movement of a person with tuberculosis, the State Health Director or local health director may move to continue the order for additional periods not to exceed one calendar year each. (1957, c. 1357, s. 1; 1983, c. 891, s. 2; 1987, c. 782, s. 15; 2002-179, s. 5; 2004-80, s. 2.)

 

§ 130A-146.  Transportation of bodies of persons who have died of reportable diseases.

No person shall transport in this State the remains of any person who has died of a disease declared by the Commission to be reported until the body has been encased in a manner as prescribed by rule by the Commission. Only persons who have complied with the rules of the Commission concerning the removal of dead bodies shall be issued a burial-transit permit. (1893, c. 214, s. 16; Rev., s. 4459; C.S., s. 7161; 1953, c. 675, s. 16; 1957, c. 1357, s. 1; 1973, c. 476, s. 128; 1983, c. 891, s. 2.)

 

§ 130A-147.  Rules of the Commission.

For the protection of the public health, the Commission is authorized to adopt rules for the detection, control and prevention of communicable diseases. (1983, c. 891, s. 2.)

 

§ 130A-148.  Laboratory tests for AIDS virus infection.

(a)        For the protection of the public health, the Commission shall adopt rules establishing standards for the certification of laboratories to perform tests for Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) virus infection.  The rules shall address, but not be limited to, proficiency testing, record maintenance, adequate staffing and confirmatory testing.  Tests for AIDS virus infection shall be performed only by laboratories certified pursuant to this subsection and only on specimens submitted by a physician licensed to practice medicine.  This subsection shall not apply to testing performed solely for research purposes under the approval of an institutional review board.

(b)        Prior to obtaining consent for donation of blood, semen, tissue or organs, a facility or institution seeking to obtain blood, tissue, semen or organs for transfusion, implantation, transplantation or administration shall provide the potential donor with information about AIDS virus transmission, and information about who should not donate.

(c)        No blood or semen may be transfused or administered when blood from the donor has not been tested or has tested positive for AIDS virus infection by a standard laboratory test.

(d)       No tissue or organs may be transplanted or implanted when blood from the donor has not been tested or has tested positive for AIDS virus infection by a standard laboratory test unless consent is obtained from the recipient, or from the recipient's guardian or a responsible adult relative of the recipient if the recipient is not competent to give such consent.

(e)        Any facility or institution that obtains or transfuses, implants, transplants, or administers blood, tissue, semen, or organs shall be immune from civil or criminal liability that otherwise might be incurred or imposed for transmission of AIDS virus infection if the provisions specified in subsections (b), (c), and (d) of this section have been complied with.

(f)        Specimens may be tested for AIDS virus infection for research or epidemiologic purposes without consent of the person from whom the specimen is obtained if all personal identifying information is removed from the specimen prior to testing.

(g)        Persons tested for AIDS virus infection shall be notified of test results and counseled appropriately.  This subsection shall not apply to tests performed by or for entities governed by Article 39 of Chapter 58 of the General Statutes, the Insurance Information and Privacy Protection Act, provided that said entities comply with the notice requirements thereof.

(h)        The Commission may authorize or require laboratory tests for AIDS virus infection when necessary to protect the public health.

A test for AIDS virus infection may also be performed upon any person solely by order of a physician licensed to practice medicine in North Carolina who is rendering medical services to that person when, in the reasonable medical judgment of the physician, the test is necessary for the appropriate treatment of the person; however, the person shall be informed that a test for AIDS virus infection is to be conducted, and shall be given clear opportunity to refuse to submit to the test prior to it being conducted, and further if informed consent is not obtained, the test may not be performed.  A physician may order a test for AIDS virus infection without the informed consent of the person tested if the person is incapable of providing or incompetent to provide such consent, others authorized to give consent for the person are not available, and testing is necessary for appropriate diagnosis or care of the person.

An unemancipated minor may be tested for AIDS virus infection without the consent of the parent or legal guardian of the minor when the parent or guardian has refused to consent to such testing and there is reasonable suspicion that the minor has AIDS virus or HIV infection or that the child has been sexually abused.

(i)         Except as provided in this section, no test for AIDS virus infection shall be required, performed or used to determine suitability for continued employment, housing or public services, or for the use of places of public accommodation as defined in G.S. 168A-3(8), or public transportation.

Further it shall be unlawful to discriminate against any person having AIDS virus or HIV infection on account of that infection in determining suitability for continued employment, housing, or public services, or for the use of places of public accommodation, as defined in G.S. 168A-3(8), or public transportation.

Any person aggrieved by an act or discriminatory practice prohibited by this subsection relating to housing shall be entitled to institute a civil action pursuant to G.S. 41A-7 of the State Fair Housing Act.  Any person aggrieved by an act or discriminatory practice prohibited by this subsection other than one relating to housing may bring a civil action to enforce rights granted or protected by this subsection.

The action shall be commenced in superior court in the county where the alleged discriminatory practice or prohibited conduct occurred or where the plaintiff or defendant resides.  Such action shall be tried to the court without a jury.  Any relief granted by the court shall be limited to declaratory and injunctive relief, including orders to hire or reinstate an aggrieved person or admit such person to a labor organization.

In a civil action brought to enforce provisions of this subsection relating to employment, the court may award back pay.  Any such back pay liability shall not accrue from a date more than two years prior to the filing of an action under this subsection.  Interim earnings or amounts earnable with reasonable diligence by the aggrieved person shall operate to reduce the back pay otherwise allowable.  In any civil action brought under this subsection, the court, in its discretion, may award reasonable attorney's fees to the substantially prevailing party as a part of costs.

A civil action brought pursuant to this subsection shall be commenced within 180 days after the date on which the aggrieved person became aware or, with reasonable diligence, should have become aware of the alleged discriminatory practice or prohibited conduct.

Nothing in this section shall be construed so as to prohibit an employer from:

(1)        Requiring a test for AIDS virus infection for job applicants in preemployment medical examinations required by the employer;

(2)        Denying employment to a job applicant based solely on a confirmed positive test for AIDS virus infection;

(3)        Including a test for AIDS virus infection performed in the course of an annual medical examination routinely required of all employees by the employer; or

(4)        Taking the appropriate employment action, including reassignment or termination of employment, if the continuation by the employee who has AIDS virus or HIV infection of his work tasks would pose a significant risk to the health of the employee, coworkers, or the public, or if the employee is unable to perform the normally assigned duties of the job.

(j)         It shall not be unlawful for a licensed health care provider or facility to:

(1)        Treat a person who has AIDS virus or HIV infection differently from persons who do not have that infection when such treatment is appropriate to protect the health care provider or employees of the provider or employees of the facility while providing appropriate care for the person who has the AIDS virus or HIV infection; or

(2)        Refer a person who has AIDS virus or HIV infection to another licensed health care provider or facility when such referral is for the purpose of providing more appropriate treatment for the person with AIDS virus or HIV infection. (1987, c. 782, s. 16; 1989, c. 698, s. 1; 1991, c. 720, s. 78.)

 

§ 130A-149: Recodified as G.S. 130A-479 by Session Laws 2002-179, s. 2, effective October 1, 2002.

 

Part 1A. Health Care-Associated Infections.

§ 130A-150.  Statewide surveillance and reporting system.

(a)        By December 31, 2011, the Department, in consultation with the State HAI Advisory Group and in accordance with rules adopted by the Commission pursuant to subsection (b) of this section, shall establish a statewide surveillance and reporting system for specified health care-associated infections.

(b)        The Commission shall adopt rules necessary to implement the statewide surveillance and reporting system established pursuant to subsection (a) of this section. The rules shall specify uniform standards for surveillance and reporting of specified health care-associated infections under the statewide surveillance and reporting system. The uniform standards shall include at least all of the following:

(1)        A preference for electronic surveillance of specified health care-associated infections to the greatest extent practicable.

(2)        A requirement for electronic reporting of specified health care-associated infections.

(c)        Each hospital, as defined in G.S. 131E-76(3), is subject to the statewide surveillance and reporting system established in accordance with subsection (a) of this section and shall be responsible for health care-associated infections surveillance and reporting of specified health care-associated infections data to the Department through the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention National Health Care Safety Network.

(d)       The Department shall release to the public aggregated and provider-specific data on health care-associated infections that does not contain social security numbers or other personal identifying information only if it deems the release of this data to be reliable and necessary to protect the public's health.

(e)        Repealed by Session Laws 2013-360, s. 12A.8(d), effective July 1, 2013.  (2011-386, ss. 1, 2; 2013-360, s. 12A.8(d).)

 

§ 130A-151.  Reserved for future codification purposes.

 

Part 2. Immunization.

§ 130A-152.  Immunization required.

(a)        Every child present in this State shall be immunized against diphtheria, tetanus, whooping cough, poliomyelitis, red measles (rubeola) and rubella. In addition, every child present in this State shall be immunized against any other disease upon a determination by the Commission that the immunization is in the interest of the public health. Every parent, guardian, person in loco parentis and person or agency, whether governmental or private, with legal custody of a child shall have the responsibility to ensure that the child has received the required immunization at the age required by the Commission. If a child has not received the required immunizations by the specified age, the responsible person shall obtain the required immunization for the child as soon as possible after the lack of the required immunization is determined.

(b)        Repealed by Session Laws 2002-179, s. 10, effective October 1, 2002.

(c)        The Commission shall adopt and the Department shall enforce rules concerning the implementation of the immunization program. The rules shall provide for:

(1)        The child's age at administration of each vaccine;

(2)        The number of doses of each vaccine;

(3)        Exemptions from the immunization requirements where medical practice suggests that immunization would not be in the best health interests of a specific category of children;

(4)        The procedures and practices for administering the vaccine; and

(5)        Redistribution of vaccines provided to local health departments.

(c1)      The Commission for Public Health shall, pursuant to G.S. 130A-152 and G.S. 130A-433, adopt rules establishing reasonable fees for the administration of vaccines and rules limiting the requirements that can be placed on children, their parents, guardians, or custodians as a condition for receiving vaccines provided by the State. These rules shall become effective January 1, 1994.

(d)       Only vaccine preparations which meet the standards of the United States Food and Drug Administration or its successor in licensing vaccines and are approved for use by the Commission may be used.

(e)        When the Commission requires immunization against a disease not listed in paragraph (a) of this section, or requires an additional dose of a vaccine, the Commission is authorized to exempt from the new requirement children who are or who have been enrolled in school (K-12) on or before the effective date of the new requirement. (1957, c. 1357, s. 1; 1971, c. 191; 1973, c. 476, s. 128; c. 632, s. 1; 1975, c. 84; 1977, c. 160; 1979, c. 56, s. 1; 1983, c. 891, s. 2; 1985, c. 158; 1993, c. 321, s. 281(a); 2002-179, s. 10; 2007-182, s. 2.)

 

§ 130A-153.  Obtaining immunization; reporting by local health departments; access to immunization information in patient records; immunization of minors.

(a)        The required immunization may be obtained from a physician licensed to practice medicine, from a local health department, or in the case of a person at least 18 years of age, from an immunizing pharmacist. Local health departments shall administer required and State-supplied immunizations at no cost to uninsured or underinsured patients with family incomes below two hundred percent (200%) of the federal poverty level. A local health department may redistribute these vaccines only in accordance with the rules of the Commission.

(b)        Local health departments shall file monthly immunization reports with the Department. The report shall be filed on forms prepared by the Department and shall state, at a minimum, each patient's age and the number of doses of each type of vaccine administered.

(c)        Immunization certificates and information concerning immunizations contained in medical or other records shall, upon request, be shared with the Department, local health departments, an immunizing pharmacist, and the patient's attending physician. In addition, an insurance institution, agent, or insurance support organization, as those terms are defined in G.S. 58-39-15, may share immunization information with the Department. The Commission may, for the purpose of assisting the Department in enforcing this Part, provide by rule that other persons may have access to immunization information, in whole or in part.

(d)       A physician or local health department may immunize a minor with the consent of a parent, guardian, or person standing in loco parentis to the minor. A physician or local health department may also immunize a minor who is presented for immunization by an adult who signs a statement that he or she is authorized by a parent, guardian, or person standing in loco parentis to the minor to obtain the immunization for the minor.  (1957, c. 1357, s. 1; 1959, c. 177; 1965, c. 652; 1971, c. 191; 1973, c. 476, s. 128; 1979, c. 56, s. 1; 1983, c. 891, s. 2; 1985, c. 743, ss. 1, 2; 1993, c. 134, s. 1; 1999-110, s. 2; 2009-451, s. 10.29A(a); 2010-31, s. 10.13(b); 2013-246, s. 5.)

 

§ 130A-154.  Certificate of immunization.

(a)        A physician or local health department administering a required vaccine shall give a certificate of immunization to the person who presented the child for immunization. The certificate shall state the name of the child, the name of the child's parent, guardian, or person responsible for the child obtaining the required immunization, the address of the child and the parent, guardian or responsible person, the date of birth of the child, the sex of the child, the number of doses of the vaccine given, the date the doses were given, the name and address of the physician or local health department administering the required immunization and other relevant information required by the Commission.

(b)        Except as otherwise provided in this subsection, a person who received immunizations in a state other than North Carolina shall present an official certificate or record of immunization to the child care facility, school (K-12), or college or university. This certificate or record shall state the person's name, address, date of birth, and sex; the type and number of doses of administered vaccine; the dates of the first MMR and the last DTP and polio; the name and address of the physician or local health department administering the required immunization; and other relevant information required by the Commission. (1957, c. 1357, s. 1; 1959, c. 177; 1965, c. 652; 1971, c. 191; 1979, c. 56, s. 1; 1983, c. 891, s. 2; 1999-110, s. 3.)

 

§ 130A-155.  Submission of certificate to child care facility, preschool and school authorities; record maintenance; reporting.

(a)        No child shall attend a school (pre K-12), whether public, private or religious, a child care facility as defined in G.S. 110-86(3), unless a certificate of immunization indicating that the child has received the immunizations required by G.S. 130A-152 is presented to the school or facility. The parent, guardian, or responsible person must present a certificate of immunization on the child's first day of attendance to the principal of the school or operator of the facility, as defined in G.S. 110-86(7). If a certificate of immunization is not presented on the first day, the principal or operator shall present a notice of deficiency to the parent, guardian or responsible person. The parent, guardian or responsible person shall have 30 calendar days from the first day of attendance to obtain the required immunization for the child. If the administration of vaccine in a series of doses given at medically approved intervals requires a period in excess of 30 calendar days, additional days upon certification by a physician may be allowed to obtain the required immunization. Upon termination of 30 calendar days or the extended period, the principal or operator shall not permit the child to attend the school or facility unless the required immunization has been obtained.

(b)        The school or child care facility shall maintain on file immunization records for all children attending the school or facility which contain the information required for a certificate of immunization as specified in G.S. 130A-154. These certificates shall be open to inspection by the Department and the local health department during normal business hours. When a child transfers to another school or facility, the school or facility which the child previously attended shall, upon request, send a copy of the child's immunization record at no charge to the school or facility to which the child has transferred.

(c)        The school shall file an annual immunization report with the Department by November 1. The child care facility shall file an immunization report annually with the Department. The report shall be filed on forms prepared by the Department and shall state the number of children attending the school or facility, the number of children who had not obtained the required immunization within 30 days of their first attendance, the number of children who received a medical exemption and the number of children who received a religious exemption.

(d)       Any adult who attends school (pre K-12), whether public, private or religious, shall obtain the immunizations required in G.S. 130A-152 and shall present to the school a certificate in accordance with this section. The physician or local health department administering a required vaccine to the adult shall give a certificate of immunization to the person. The certificate shall state the person's name, address, date of birth and sex; the number of doses of the vaccine given; the date the doses were given; the name and addresses of the physician or local health department administering the required immunization; and other relevant information required by the Commission. (1957, c. 1357, s. 1; 1959, c. 177; 1965, c. 652; 1971, c. 191; 1973, c. 632, s. 2; 1979, c. 56, s. 1; 1981, c. 44; 1983, c. 891, s. 2; 1997-506, s. 47; 1999-110, s. 4; 2007-187, s. 2.)

 

§ 130A-155.1.  Submission of certificate to college or universities.

(a)        Except as otherwise provided in this section, no person shall attend a college or university, whether public, private, or religious, unless a certificate of immunization or a record of immunization from a high school located in North Carolina indicating that the person has received immunizations required by G.S. 130A-152 is presented to the college or university. The person shall present a certificate or record of immunization on or before the date the person first registers for a quarter or semester during which the student will reside on the campus or first registers for more than four traditional day credit hours to the registrar of the college or university. If a certificate or record of immunization is not in the possession of the college or university on the date of first registration, the college or university shall present a notice of deficiency to the student. The student shall have 30 calendar days from the date of the student's first registration to obtain the required immunization. If immunization requires a series of doses and the period necessary to give the vaccine at standard intervals extends beyond the date of the first registration, the student shall be allowed to attend the college or university upon written certification by a physician that the standard series is in progress. The physician shall state the time period needed to complete the series. Upon termination of this time period, the college or university shall not permit the student to continue in attendance unless the required immunization has been obtained.

(b)        The college or university shall maintain on file immunization records for all students attending the school which contain the information required for a certificate of immunization as specified in G.S. 130A-154. These certificates shall be open to inspection by the Department and the local health department during normal business hours. When a student transfers to another college or university, the college or university which the student previously attended shall, upon request, send a copy of the student's immunization record at no charge to the college or university to which the student has transferred.

(c)        Within 60 calendar days after the commencement of a new school year, the college or university shall file an immunization report with the Department. The report shall be filed on forms prepared by the Department and shall state the number of students attending the school or facility, the number of students who had not obtained the required immunization within 30 days of their first attendance, the number of students who received a medical exemption and the number of students who received a religious exemption.

(d)       Repealed by Session Laws 1999-110, s. 5.

(e)        The provisions of this section shall not apply to:

(1)        Educational institutions established under Chapter 115D of the General Statutes.

(2)        Students residing off-campus and registering for any combination of:

a.         Off-campus courses.

b.         Evening courses.

c.         Weekend courses.

d.         No more than four traditional day credit hours in on-campus courses. (1985, c. 692, s. 1; 1987, c. 782, s. 17; 1991, c. 381, s. 1; 1999-110, s. 5; 2007-99, s. 1.)

 

§ 130A-156.  Medical exemption.

The Commission for Public Health shall adopt by rule medical contraindications to immunizations required by G.S. 130A-152. If a physician licensed to practice medicine in this State certifies that a required immunization is or may be detrimental to a person's health due to the presence of one of the contraindications adopted by the Commission, the person is not required to receive the specified immunization as long as the contraindication persists. The State Health Director may, upon request by a physician licensed to practice medicine in this State, grant a medical exemption to a required immunization for a contraindication not on the list adopted by the Commission. (1957, c. 1357, s. 1; 1959, c. 177; 1965, c. 652; 1971, c. 191; 1979, c. 56, s. 1; 1983, c. 891, s. 2; 1987, c. 782, s. 18; 1989, c. 122; 1999-110, s. 6; 2007-182, s. 2.)

 

§ 130A-157.  Religious exemption.

If the bona fide religious beliefs of an adult or the parent, guardian or person in loco parentis of a child are contrary to the immunization requirements contained in this Chapter, the adult or the child shall be exempt from the requirements. Upon submission of a written statement of the bona fide religious beliefs and opposition to the immunization requirements, the person may attend the college, university, school or facility without presenting a certificate of immunization. (1957, c. 1357, s. 1; 1959, c. 177; 1965, c. 652; 1971, c. 191; 1979, c. 56, s. 1; 1983, c. 891, s. 2; 1985, c. 692, s. 2; 2002-179, s. 17.)

 

§ 130A-158.  Restitution required when vaccine spoiled due to provider negligence.

Immunization program providers shall be liable for restitution to the State for the cost of replacement vaccine when vaccine in the provider's inventory has become spoiled or unstable due to the provider's negligence and unreasonable failure to properly handle or store the vaccine. (2001-424, s. 21.86(a).)

 

§ 130A-159.  Reserved for future codification purposes.

 

Part 3.  Venereal Disease.

§§ 130A-160 through 130A-166:  Repealed by Session Laws 1991, c.  225, s. 2.

 

§ 130A-171:  Repealed.

 

§ 130A-172:  Repealed.

 

§ 130A-173:  Repealed.

 

§ 130A-174:  Repealed.

 

§ 130A-175.  Reserved for future codification purposes.

 

§ 130A-176.  Reserved for future codification purposes.

 

§ 130A-177:  Repealed.

 

§ 130A-178:  Repealed.

 

§ 130A-179.  Repealed by Session Laws 1987, c. 782, s. 20.

 

§§ 130A-180 through 130A-183.  Reserved for future codification purposes.

 

Part 6. Rabies.

§ 130A-184.  Definitions.

The following definitions apply in this Part:

(1)        Animal Control Officer. - A city or county employee whose responsibility includes animal control. The term "Animal Control Officer" also includes agents of a private organization that is operating an animal shelter under contract with a city or county whenever those agents are performing animal control functions at the shelter.

(2)        Cat. - A domestic  feline of the genus and species Felis catus.

(3)        Certified rabies vaccinator. - A person appointed and certified to administer rabies vaccine to animals in accordance with this Part.

(4)        Dog. - A domestic  canine of the genus, species, and subspecies Canis lupus familiaris.

(4a)      Feral. - An animal that is not socialized.

(4b)      Ferret. - A domestic mammal of the genus, species, and subspecies Mustela putorius furo.

(5)        Rabies vaccine. - An animal rabies vaccine licensed by the United States Department of Agriculture and approved for use in this State by the Commission.

(6)        State Public Heath Veterinarian. - A person appointed by the Secretary to direct the State public health veterinary program.

(6a)      Stray. - An animal that meets both of the following conditions:

a.         Is beyond the limits of confinement or lost.

b.         Is not wearing any tags, microchips, tattoos, or other methods of identification.

(7)        Vaccination. - The administration of rabies vaccine by a person authorized to administer it under G.S. 130A-185.  (1935, c. 122, s. 1; 1949, c. 645, s. 1; 1953, c. 876, s. 1; 1957, c. 1357, s. 3; 1973, c. 476, s. 128; 1983, c. 891, s. 2; 2009-304, s. 2; 2009-327, s. 1.)

 

§ 130A-185.  Vaccination required.

(a)        Vaccination required. - The owner of an animal listed in this subsection over four months of age shall have the animal vaccinated against rabies:

(1)        Cat.

(2)        Dog.

(3)        Ferret.

(b)        Vaccination. - Only animal rabies vaccine licensed by the United States Department of Agriculture and approved by the Commission shall be used on animals in this State. A rabies vaccine may only be administered by one or more of the following:

(1)        A licensed veterinarian.

(2)        A registered veterinary technician under the direct supervision of a licensed veterinarian.

(3)        A certified rabies vaccinator.  (1935, c. 122, s. 1; 1941, c. 259, s. 2; 1953, c. 876, s. 2; 1973, c. 476, s. 128; 1983, c. 891, s. 2; 2009-327, s. 2.)

 

§ 130A-186.  Appointment and certification of certified rabies vaccinator.

In those counties where licensed veterinarians are not available to participate in all scheduled county rabies control clinics, the local health director shall appoint one or more persons for the purpose of administering rabies vaccine to animals in that county. Whether or not licensed veterinarians are available, the local health director may appoint one or more persons for the purpose of administering rabies vaccine to animals in their county and these persons will make themselves available to participate in the county rabies control program. The State Public Health Veterinarian shall provide at least four hours of training to those persons appointed by the local health director to administer rabies vaccine. Upon satisfactory completion of the training, the State Public Health Veterinarian shall certify in writing that the appointee has demonstrated a knowledge and procedure acceptable for the administration of rabies vaccine to animals. A certified rabies vaccinator shall be authorized to administer rabies vaccine to animals in the county until the appointment by the local health director has been terminated. (1935, c. 122, s. 3; 1941, c. 259, s. 3; 1953, c. 876, s. 3; 1957, c. 1357, s. 4; 1983, c. 891, s. 2.)

 

§ 130A-187.  County rabies vaccination clinics.

(a)        Local Clinics. - The local health director shall organize or assist other county departments to organize at least one countywide rabies vaccination clinic per year for the purpose of vaccinating animals required to be vaccinated under this Part. Public notice of the time and place of rabies vaccination clinics shall be published in a newspaper having general circulation within the area.

(b)        Fee. - The county board of commissioners may establish a fee to be charged for a rabies vaccination given at a county rabies vaccination clinic. The fee amount may consist of the following:

(1)        A charge for administering and storing the vaccine, not to exceed ten dollars ($10.00).

(2)        The actual cost of the rabies vaccine, the vaccination certificate, and the rabies vaccination tag.  (1983, c. 891, s. 2; 1987, c. 219; 2009-327, s. 3.)

 

§ 130A-188: Repealed by Session Laws 2009-327, s. 4, effective October 1, 2009.

 

§ 130A-189.  Rabies vaccination certificates.

A person who administers a rabies vaccine shall complete a rabies vaccination certificate. The Commission shall adopt rules specifying the information that must be included on the certificate. An original rabies vaccination certificate shall be given to the owner of the animal that receives the rabies vaccine. A copy of the rabies vaccination certificate shall be retained by the licensed veterinarian or the certified rabies vaccinator. A copy shall also be given to the county agency responsible for animal control, provided the information given to the county agency shall not be used for commercial purposes.  (1935, c. 122, s. 6; 1941, c. 259, s. 5; 1959, c. 352; 1983, c. 891, s. 2; 1993, c. 245, s. 1; 2009-327, s. 5.)

 

§ 130A-190.  Rabies vaccination tags.

(a)        Issuance. - A person who administers a rabies vaccine shall issue a rabies vaccination tag to the owner of the animal. The rabies vaccination tag shall show the year issued, a vaccination number, the words "North Carolina" or the initials "N.C." and the words "rabies vaccine." Dogs shall wear rabies vaccination tags at all times. Cats and ferrets must wear rabies vaccination tags unless they are exempt from wearing the tags by local ordinance.

(b)        Fee. - Rabies vaccination tags, links, and rivets may be obtained from the Department of Health and Human Services. The Secretary is authorized to collect a fee for the rabies tags, links, and rivets in accordance with this subsection. The fee for each tag is the sum of the following:

(1)        The actual cost of the rabies tag, links, and rivets.

(2)        Transportation costs.

(3)        Fifteen cents (15˘). This portion of the fee shall be used to fund rabies education and prevention programs.

(4)        Repealed by Session Laws 2010-31, s. 11.4(h), effective October 1, 2010.

(c)        Repealed by Session Laws 2007-487, s. 1, effective January 1, 2008.  (1935, c. 122, s. 6; 1941, c. 259, s. 5; 1959, c. 352; 1983, c. 891, s. 2; 1997-69, s. 1; 2000-163, s. 2; 2007-487, s. 1; 2009-327, s. 6; 2010-31, s. 11.4(h).)

 

§ 130A-191.  Possession and distribution of rabies vaccine.

It shall be unlawful for persons other than licensed veterinarians, certified rabies vaccinators and persons engaged in the distribution of rabies vaccine to possess rabies vaccine.  Persons engaged in the distribution of vaccines may distribute, sell and offer to sell rabies vaccine only to licensed veterinarians and certified rabies vaccinators. (1987, c. 218.)

 

§ 130A-192.  Animals not wearing required rabies vaccination tags.

(a)        The Animal Control Officer shall canvass the county to determine if there are any animals not wearing the required rabies vaccination tag. If an animal required to wear a tag is found not wearing one, the Animal Control Officer shall check to see if the owner's identification can be found on the animal. If the animal is wearing an owner identification tag with information enabling the owner of the animal to be contacted, or if the Animal Control Officer otherwise knows who the owner is, the Animal Control Officer shall notify the owner in writing to have the animal vaccinated against rabies and to produce the required rabies vaccination certificate to the Animal Control Officer within three days of the notification. If the animal is not wearing an owner identification tag and the Animal Control Officer does not otherwise know who the owner is, the Animal Control Officer may impound the animal. The duration of the impoundment of these animals shall be established by the county board of commissioners, but the duration shall not be less than 72 hours. During the impoundment period, the Animal Control Officer shall make a reasonable effort to locate the owner of the animal. If the Animal Control Officer has access at no cost or at a reasonable cost to a microchip scanning device, the Animal Control Officer shall scan the animal and utilize any information that may be available through a microchip to locate the owner of the animal, if possible. If the animal is not reclaimed by its owner during the impoundment period, the animal shall be disposed of in one of the following manners: returned to the owner; adopted as a pet by a new owner; or put to death by a procedure approved by rules adopted by the Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services or, in the absence of such rules, by a procedure approved by the American Veterinary Medical Association, the Humane Society of the United States or of the American Humane Association.

(a1)      Before an animal may be put to death, it shall be made available for adoption as provided in G.S. 19A-32.1.

(a2)      Repealed by Session Laws 2013-377, s. 3, effective July 29, 2013.

(a3)      The Animal Control Officer shall maintain a record of all animals impounded under this section which shall include the date of impoundment, the length of impoundment, the method of disposal of the animal and the name of the person or institution to whom any animal has been released.

(b)        through (e) Repealed by Session Laws 2013-377, s. 3, effective July 29, 2013.  (1935, c. 122, s. 8; 1983, c. 891, s. 2; 2009-304, s. 1; 2009-327, s. 7; 2013-377, s. 3.)

 

§ 130A-193.  Vaccination and confinement of animals brought into this State.

(a)        Vaccination Required. - An animal brought into this State that is required to be vaccinated under this Part shall immediately be securely confined and shall be vaccinated against rabies within one week after entry. The animal shall remain confined for two weeks after vaccination.

(b)        Exceptions. - The provisions of subsection (a) shall not apply to:

(1)        An animal brought into this State for exhibition purposes if the animal is confined and not permitted to run at large.

(2)        An animal brought into this State accompanied by a certificate issued by a licensed veterinarian showing that the animal is apparently free from and has not been exposed to rabies and that the animal is currently vaccinated against rabies.  (1935, c. 122, s. 11; 1983, c. 891, s. 2; 2009-327, s. 8.)

 

§ 130A-194.  Quarantine of districts infected with rabies.

An area may be declared under quarantine against rabies by the local health director when the disease exists to the extent that the lives of persons are endangered. When quarantine is declared, each animal in the area that is required to be vaccinated under this Part shall be confined on the premises of the owner or in a veterinary hospital unless the animal is on a leash or under the control and in the sight of a responsible adult.  (1935, c. 122, s. 12; 1941, c. 259, s. 9; 1949, c. 645, s. 3; 1953, c. 876, s. 8; 1957, c. 1357, s. 8; 1983, c. 891, s. 2; 2009-327, s. 9.)

 

§ 130A-195.  Destroying stray or feral animals in quarantine districts.

When quarantine has been declared and stray or feral animals continue to run uncontrolled in the area, any peace officer or Animal Control Officer shall have the right, after reasonable effort has been made to apprehend the animals, to destroy the stray or feral animals and properly dispose of their bodies.  (1935, c. 122, s. 13; 1953, c. 876, s. 9; 1983, c. 891, s. 2; 2009-327, s. 10.)

 

§ 130A-196.  Notice and confinement of biting animals.

(a)        Notice. - When a person has been bitten by an animal required to be vaccinated under this Part, the person or parent, guardian or person standing in loco parentis of the person, and the person owning the animal or in control or possession of the animal shall notify the local health director immediately and give the name and address of the person bitten and the owner of the animal. If the animal that bites a person is a stray or feral animal, the local agency responsible for animal control shall make a reasonable attempt to locate the owner of the animal. If the owner cannot be identified within 72 hours of the event, the local health director may authorize the animal be euthanized, and the head of the animal shall be immediately sent to the State Laboratory of Public Health for rabies diagnosis. If the event occurs on a weekend or State holiday the time period for owner identification shall be extended 24 hours.

A physician who attends a person bitten by an animal known to be a potential carrier of rabies shall report the incident within 24 hours to the local health director. The report must include the name, age, and sex of the person.

(b)        Confinement. - When an animal required to be vaccinated under this Part bites a person, the animal shall be immediately confined for 10 days in a place designated by the local health director. The local health director may authorize a dog trained and used by a law enforcement agency to be released from confinement to perform official duties upon submission of proof that the dog has been vaccinated for rabies in compliance with this Part. After reviewing the circumstances of the particular case, the local health director may allow the owner to confine the animal on the owner's property. An owner who fails to confine an animal in accordance with the instructions of the local health director shall be guilty of a Class 2 misdemeanor. If the owner or the person who controls or possesses the animal that has bitten a person refuses to confine the animal as required by this subsection, the local health director may order seizure of the animal and its confinement for 10 days at the expense of the owner.  (1935, c. 122, s. 17; 1941, c. 259, s. 11; 1953, c. 876, s. 13; 1957, c. 1357, s. 9; 1977, c. 628; 1983, c. 891, s. 2; 1985, c. 674; 1989, c. 298; 1993, c. 539, s. 950; 1994, Ex. Sess., c. 24, s. 14(c); 2009-327, s. 11.)

 

§ 130A-197.  Infected animals to be destroyed; protection of vaccinated animals.

When the local health director reasonably suspects that an animal required to be vaccinated under this Part has been exposed to the saliva or nervous tissue of a proven rabid animal or animal reasonably suspected of having rabies that is not available for laboratory diagnosis, the animal shall be considered to have been exposed to rabies. An animal exposed to rabies shall be destroyed immediately by its owner, the county Animal Control Officer or a peace officer unless the animal has been vaccinated against rabies in accordance with this Part and the rules of the Commission more than 28 days prior to being exposed, and is given a booster dose of rabies vaccine within five days of the exposure. As an alternative to destruction, the animal may be quarantined at a facility approved by the local health director for a period up to six months, and under reasonable conditions imposed by the local health director.  (1935, c. 122, s. 14; 1953, c. 876, s. 10; 1983, c. 891, s. 2; 2000-163, s. 4; 2009-327, s. 12.)

 

§ 130A-198.  Confinement.

A person who owns or has possession of an animal which is suspected of having rabies shall immediately notify the local health director or county Animal Control Officer and shall securely confine the animal in a place designated by the local health director. The animal shall be confined for a period of 10 days. Other animals may be destroyed at the discretion of the State Public Health Veterinarian.  (1935, c. 122, s. 15; c. 344; 1941, c. 259, s. 10; 1953, c. 876, s. 11; 1983, c. 891, s. 2; 2009-327, s. 13.)

 

§ 130A-199.  Rabid animals to be destroyed; heads to be sent to State Laboratory of Public Health.

An animal diagnosed as having rabies by a licensed veterinarian shall be destroyed and its head sent to the State Laboratory of Public Health. The heads of all animals that die during a confinement period required by this Part shall be immediately sent to the State Laboratory of Public Health for rabies diagnosis.  (1935, c. 122, s. 16; 1953, c. 876, s. 12; 1973, c. 476, s. 128; 1983, c. 891, s. 2; 2009-327, s. 14.)

 

§ 130A-200.  Confinement or leashing of vicious animals.

A local health director may declare an animal to be vicious and a menace to the public health when the animal has attacked a person causing bodily harm without being teased, molested, provoked, beaten, tortured or otherwise harmed. When an animal has been declared to be vicious and a menace to the public health, the local health director shall order the animal to be confined to its owner's property. However, the animal may be permitted to leave its owner's property when accompanied by a responsible adult and restrained on a leash. (1935, c. 122, s. 18; 1953, c. 876, s. 14; 1983, c. 891, s. 2.)

 

§ 130A-201.  Rabies emergency.

A local health director in whose county or district rabies is found in the wild animal population as evidenced by a positive diagnosis of rabies in the past year in any wild animal, except a bat, may petition the State Health Director to declare a rabies emergency in the county or district. In determining whether a rabies emergency exists, the State Health Director shall consult with the Public Health Veterinarian and the State Agriculture Veterinarian and may consult with any other source of veterinary expertise the State Health Director deems advisable. Upon finding that a rabies emergency exists in a county or district, the State Health Director shall petition the Executive Director of the Wildlife Resources Commission to develop a plan pursuant to G.S. 113-291.2(a1) to reduce the threat of rabies exposure to humans and domestic animals by foxes, raccoons, skunks, or bobcats in the county or district. Upon determination by the State Health Director that the rabies emergency no longer exists for a county or district, the State Health Director shall immediately notify the Executive Director of the Wildlife Resources Commission. (1997-402, s. 1.)

 

§ 130A-202.  Reserved for future codification purposes.

 

§ 130A-203.  Reserved for future codification purposes.

 

§ 130A-204.  Reserved for future codification purposes.